Architecture

111 Noble Street

Reveal for 111 Noble Street, Greenpoint, Brooklyn

The blocks of Greenpoint are hardly renowned for their historic architecture, which is why it is confusing that applications for a new building in the neighborhood would even have to go through the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s approval process. But with plastic-sided housing now vulnerable to the politics of nostalgia, even sites like 111 Noble Street must navigate the city’s tendrils of red tape.

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459 Quincy Street

Permits Filed for 459 Quincy Street, Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn

Building applications have been filed for a vacant site at 459 Quincy Street, next to Throop Avenue, in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant. Robert Bianchini’s ARC Architecture + Design Studio is the architect of record, and the new structure will have a total area of 10,859 square feet. Within that, there will be 7,408 square feet of residential space, to be divided amongst ten units, likely rentals. There will be four floors as well as a penthouse level, and four duplex units will be included within the mix, including one that begins on the fourth floor and then takes the entirety of the penthouse. Yosef Elishaiev of Rutland 491 LLC is listed as the developer.


1032 Intervale Avenue

Permits Filed for 1032 Intervale Avenue, Foxhurst, Bronx

A vacant lot in the Bronx’s Foxhurst neighborhood is about to sprout an eight-story building. Applications filed by the Stagg Group show the structure will have a total area of about 56,000 square feet, of which, 42,509 square feet will be residential space, to be divided amongst 63 rental apartments. There will be nine units per floor, as well as a 17-car parking garage on the first floor of the project. There will also be another 15 parking spaces in an off-street surface parking lot. Edmund Fogel of WMW Architects, P.C. is listed as the architect of record, and the site is located one block north of the Intervale Avenue stop on the 2 and 5 trains.


Waterline Square

Waterline Square Making Headway, Upper West Side

The southwestern blocks of the Upper West Side have been in a state of constant flux over the past few years, with several major developments either wrapping up or breaking ground across the last wide-open spaces remaining in the neighborhood. Perhaps the largest project within this area is GID Development’s Waterline Square, formerly known as Riverside Center, where construction on three new buildings is now pushing upwards and into the skyline.

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