Community Facility

4511 Third Avenue

Ground Broken for Two-Building, 314-Affordable-Unit Mixed-Use Project at 4511 Third Avenue, Belmont

Over the summer, YIMBY revealed a rendering of the 11-story, 181-affordable-unit mixed-use building planned at 4511 Third Avenue, in the Belmont section of the Bronx. Details for separate 12-story, 133-affordable-unit mixed-use project down the street at 4439 Third Avenue were also included. The developers, SBS Health System, L+M Development Partners, and Hornig Capital Partners, have recently broken ground on the project. The new buildings will measure 294,207 square feet and 145,952 square feet, respectively.

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118-36 Merrick Boulevard

Two-Story, 74-Bed Co-Ed Community Residential Facility Filed at 118-36 Merrick Boulevard, St. Albans

Roslyn, N.Y.-based Bama Associates has filed applications for a two-story, 74-bed co-ed community residential facility at 118-36 Merrick Boulevard, located on the corner of 119th Avenue in St. Albans, Queens. The new building will measure 9,596 square feet. It’s unknown what exactly the facility will be used for, but indications are that it will be some form of shelter, temporary housing, or recovery program. There will be administrative offices, meeting rooms, group rooms, medical offices, and a lobby on the ground floor, followed by bedrooms and lounges on the second floor. The cellar will contain a pharmacy, a dining room, classrooms, a recreation room, and addition offices. H2M Architects + Engineers is the architect of record. An existing single-story commercial building must first be demolished.


37-12 92nd Street

Four-Story, 7,700-Square-Foot Medical Building Coming to 37-12 92nd Street, Jackson Heights

Elmhurst-based Advanced Properties has filed applications for a four-story, 7,760-square-foot medical office building at 37-12 92nd Street, on the southern side of Jackson Heights. The project will contain 6,000 square feet of medical space for doctors’ offices across the cellar through fourth floors. There will also be two off-street parking spaces. Frank Petruso’s Great Neck, N.Y.-based architecture firm is the architect of record. The 30-foot-wide, 3,000-square-foot lot is currently occupied by a two-story house. Demolition permits were filed in February. The 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue stop on the 7 train is two blocks away.


Museum of Natural History

American Museum of Natural History Files Expansion Plans With Landmarks Preservation Commission

The American Museum of Natural History, located between West 77th and 81st streets on the Upper West Side, has filed plans with the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) for their expansion project, the Wall Street Journal reported. Since the museum board approved the Studio Gang Architects-designed project late last year, the proposed expansion has grown from 218,000 square feet to 235,000 square feet. Also, the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation — a ground-up six-story structure near 79th Street — has been altered to cut into only a quarter of an acre of Theodore Roosevelt Park, down from half an acre. Changes to the 2015 plans include reducing the number of trees removed from nine to seven, and demolishing three existing structures. Extensive reconfiguration work and upgrades to park space remain key elements of the project. In addition to the LPC, the Parks Department must also approve the project. Completion is tentatively expected in 2020.

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Former synagogue at 212 West 93rd Street. Photo via Wikipedia Commons.

14-Story Mixed-Use Building with Synagogue Planned at 212 West 93rd Street, Upper West Side

Congregation Shaare Zedek has partnered with developer Ornstein Leyton Company for a mixed-use project on the site of the congregation’s three-story synagogue at 212 West 93rd Street, on the Upper West Side. The congregation is having financial troubles and has concluded the only way to prevent it from dissolving is to sell the property to a developer, DNAinfo reported. Preliminary plans call for a 14-story building that would contain a new synagogue on the lower three floors, followed by residential units on the upper floors. No new building applications have been filed with the Buildings Department. The congregation has stated that it’s not feasible to expand the existing structure or retain the façade for a new building. The synagogue is not landmarked and can be demolished as-of-right.


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