BKSK Architects

200 East 21st Street

Developer Plans 20-Story, 65-Unit Mixed-Use Building At 200 East 21st Street, Gramercy

In the summer of 2015, Chelsea-based Alfa Development entered into contract to acquire the development site spanning 253-261 Third Avenue (a.k.a 200 East 21st Street), in Gramercy, and now the developer is planning a 20-story, 65-unit mixed-use building. The Real Deal reports the project will measure 104,700 square feet in total and will include 7,200 square feet of ground-floor retail space. The rest of the new building will contain 65 condominium units, which will come in one- to four-bedroom layouts. BKSK Architects will be responsible for the design. Reportedly, the developers filed permits for the project, although they have yet to hit public record. Demolition permits, however, are on file for all of the assemblage’s existing buildings. Four three-story structures are to be demolished at 253-259 Third Avenue, and a five-story, 12-unit tenement building at 200 East 21st Street will be razed.


Landmarks Commissioners Make Feelings Known As Gansevoort Market Presentation Continues Without Approval

William Gottlieb Real Estate and Aurora Capital’s Meatpacking District proposal is not yet a go. On Tuesday, the Landmarks Preservation Commission took no action on the BKSK Architects-designed project on the block from 46-74 Gansevoort Street, between Greenwich Street and Washington Street, in the Gansevoort Market Historic District. The commissioners didn’t seem like they’d require the current low-scale structures to remain as is, but certainly had issues with just how big they’d get and just how it would look.

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A rendering of the proposal for 46-74 Gansevoort Street as seen from the Whitney Museum of American Art. All renderings courtesy BKSK Architects.

Architects Tout Gansevoort Market Plan As Return to History

In November, a plan for a commercial revitalization of the south side of a block of Gansevoort Street, in the Meatpacking District, went before the Landmarks Preservation Commission. In a rare, but hardly unheard of occurrence, the hearing was paused before the commissioners could discuss the proposal. With the continuation of that session likely to come soon, YIMBY sat down with the architects behind it to talk about its place in the history of the area.

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Some of biggest current adaptive reuse projects: St. Ann's Warehouse (via Curbed NY), 111 West 57th Street, Tammany Hall, 10 Jay Street, and 28 Liberty Street

LPC Chair, Top Architects Review NYC’s Adaptive Reuse Projects

The New York City landmarks law was signed 50 years ago this year. So, what better time to talk about some of its successes? Plenty of great structures, such as the Empire State Building, completed in 1931 as a multi-tenant office building, are easy to keep relevant and functioning. Others, however, become obsolete and can no longer perform their originally intended purpose. That’s where adaptive reuse comes in. If you haven’t heard the term, it’s when an old structure is adapted for a new use. It’s often how we are saving our great city.

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