Infrastructure

The Lowline

Lower East Side’s Lowline Underground Park Moves Forward with First City Approval

The New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development (EOHED) have selected the team behind the Lowline proposal to lease the vacant, 60,000-square-foot Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal, located under Delancey Street between Clinton and Norfolk streets on the Lower East Side. This marks the first city approval for the project, bringing it significantly closer to reality. The public park would take up roughly 43,500 square feet of the abandoned terminal.


401 East 34th Street

Single-Story, 6,000-Square-Foot Retail Building Filed at 401 East 34th Street, Kips Bay

Property owner UDR has filed applications for a single-story, 6,179-square-foot retail building at 401 East 34th Street, located on the corner of East 35th Street and First Avenue in Kips Bay. The new structure will host a restaurant on the ground floor and retail space in the cellar. It will be located on the grounds of Joseph Slifka Park, where a playground currently exists. The new retail space won’t have to be approved through the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) even though it’s being built on public park space. In October of 2015, Community Board 6 voted to allow retail project to proceed without a rezoning/city approval. Brooklyn-based Much Architecture is the architect of record. The park – which was built as part of the 35-story, 706-rental-unit residential building View 34 (previously known as Rivergate) – will also see an overhaul, with upgrades including a new dog run and an artificial turf area.


A LinkNYC kiosk. Credit: @linknycofficial on Instagram

Landmarks Approves LinkNYC Wi-Fi Kiosks for Historic Districts and Other Designated Sites

For a long time, with the proliferation of cell phones, the payphone has been mostly just a historical curiosity. For years now, they have actually been disappearing from New York City streets. Since January, some of them have been replaced by new public communication structures. Now, with a vote Tuesday by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, those structures will be headed to historic districts and other designated sites.

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Liberty Park

World Trade Center’s Liberty Park Opens Today in the Financial District

The World Trade Center’s Liberty Park is now receiving its finishing touches for its grand opening today. The Financial District’s new, one-acre public park is 25 feet above street level and measures 336 feet along Liberty Street between West and Greenwich streets. It will feature 19 planters, a half-dozen species of plants, seating made out of recycled teak, and a 300-foot-long “Living Wall” of greenery along its northern base. Pictures of it ahead of its opening can be seen in a New York Times report. It will be open to all from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. each day. Aecom’s Joseph E. Brown is the landscape architect, and the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey is behind the project. The Santiago Calatrava-designed St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church can also be seen taking shape on the site’s eastern end. That portion of the project is expected to be complete in 2017. YIMBY last brought you an update on Liberty Park when construction was in its final phases in May.


Berry Lane Park

17.5-Acre Berry Lane Park Opens to the Public in Jersey City

Mayor Steven Fulop, with the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency (JCRA) and other officials, held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Saturday for the 17.5-acre Berry Lane Park, located in the Bergen-Lafayette section of Jersey City. It is the both the city’s largest municipal park and the first new one in decades. The public park is the site of a former brownfield property bound by Garfield Avenue to the west, NJ Transit’s rail tracks to the south, and Woodward Street to the east. It features two basketball courts, two tennis courts, a baseball diamond, a soccer field, bike paths, and two plazas (one with a splash pad). Over 600 new trees have also been planted. The Department of Recreation is in charge of hosting community events and games in the park. The site once consisted of abandoned and underutilized industrial properties, although the city demolished many of the structures, then remediated and graded the land by 2014. Multiple concrete silos were preserved and utilized for the splash pond. Berry Lane Park is right across the street from NJ Transit’s Garfield Avenue Hudson-Bergen Light Rail station.


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