YIMBY Scopes Views From SHoP’s Topped-Out ‘Brooklyn Tower’ at 9 DeKalb Avenue in Downtown Brooklyn

9 DeKalb Avenue. Rendering by SHoP Architects

Construction has topped out on the newly renamed Brooklyn Tower, a 93-story supertall skyscraper and the tallest structure in the Outer Boroughs at 9 DeKalb Avenue in Downtown Brooklyn. Designed by SHoP Architects and developed by JDS, the 1,066-foot-tall tower will yield 550 residences, with 150 for purchase, as well as a 100,000-square-foot retail podium bound by Flatbush Avenue Extension to the northeast, Fleet Street to the northwest, and DeKalb Avenue to the south. The project also includes the refurbishing and re-purposing of the landmarked Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn, which is being incorporated into the podium. Douglas Elliman is the exclusive marketing, sales, and leasing agent.

Since our last update in September the tower has reached its final height, becoming New York’s first supertall outside of Manhattan.

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Dime Savings Bank and The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Dime Savings Bank. Photo by Michael Young

The Dime Savings Bank. Photo by Michael Young

“Today marks a significant milestone for Brooklyn and New York City as The Brooklyn Tower reaches its peak, continuing Brooklyn’s long history of design innovation and bold thinking,” said Michael Stern, founder and CEO of JDS Development, the developer and builder of the project. “We take great pride in the thoughtful work that SHoP and our JDS Construction team have done to create this unprecedented new tower, while carefully preserving the historic Brooklyn landmark.”

The Dime Savings Bank and The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

“The SHoP team is thrilled to be a part of a project that is so impactful to one of the world’s most acclaimed skylines,” said Gregg Pasquarelli, founding principal of SHoP Architects. “As more people look to move to Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, the detail that went into the texture and shape of the structure was critical. We wanted it to remain authentic, with that baroque, Brooklyn charm, but also look crisp and modern to capture the borough’s constant state of growth and influence.”

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

There was a steel beam in Albee Square Plaza that people could sign before its eventual lifting.

The final steel beam. Photo by Michael Young

Additional steel columns and beams are being installed around the southern corner of the retail podium facing Flatbush Avenue South.

The retail podium for The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The event at The Brooklyn Tower began in the adjacent historic bank hall. An Open House New York event was wrapping up prior to the late-afternoon tour. The columns and ceilings were colorfully illuminated and it was nice to see the interiors largely saved and continuing to be restored to their former glory.

The Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn. Photo by Michael Young

The Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn. Photo by Michael Young

The entrance ornamentation at the Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn. Photo by Michael Young

The clock centerpiece at the Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn. Photo by Michael Young

The clock centerpiece at the Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn. Photo by Michael Young

Traveling up the exterior hoists gave views of the Financial District popping up from behind the surrounding skyscrapers. At the top, the building offers 360-degree views of all of New York City. Highlights include the Atlantic Ocean and Verrazano Narrows Bridge, One World Trade Center over the Financial District, the Empire State Building in the heart of Midtown, the ever-growing presence of massive office and residential buildings being built in Hudson Yards, One Vanderbilt’s tiered crown and spire, the supertalls of Billionaires’ Row including JDS and SHoP’s other supertall collaboration at 111 West 57th Street, and the array of new housing in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Hunters Point, Queens going up along the East River.

Looking north. Photo by Michael Young

Looking toward the Financial District. Photo by Michael Young

Looking south. Photo by Michael Young

Looking towards the harbor. Photo by Michael Young

Looking north at night. Photo by Michael Young

Midtown, Manhattan. Photo by Michael Young

We should expect the dark floor-to-ceiling glass and stainless steel and aluminum façade to reach the crown in the first half of next year, followed by the dismantling of the exterior elevator hoist and construction crane, which would eventually give us the true profile look and skinny proportions of the tower.

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The Brooklyn Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Also part of the design program is over 100,000 square feet of amenities such as a state-of-the-art fitness center with an elevated outdoor loggia and recreational space. Thirty percent of rentals are designated as affordable housing units, and residences for purchase start over 500 feet above street level. Residential interiors are designed by AD100 design firm Gachot Studios, with amenity interiors design lead by Krista Ninivaggi of Woods Bagot, and landscape design by HMWhite.

The Brooklyn Tower is anticipated to launch residences for sale in early 2022, residences for lease mid-2022, and open for occupancy in late 2022.

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16 Comments on "YIMBY Scopes Views From SHoP’s Topped-Out ‘Brooklyn Tower’ at 9 DeKalb Avenue in Downtown Brooklyn"

  1. Lots of Dimes.

  2. If I’m going to pay millions to live in a supertall, it is going to be in Manhattan.

    • You’ve never been to this part of Brooklyn huh?

      • I have, if that was meant for me, and it’s not so nice….but the point is, if you have those millions, you can live in Santa Barbara, or Cannes, or Begur, or Punta….or in Brooklyn. The point of the Yimby comments might be more architectural in nature – and, as much as I have no love for SHOP – they pulled off a first rate building in imagination, in detailing, and it does aid to bring an economy back to Brooklyn. And, the views back to the city are million dollar views.

  3. David : Sent From Heaven. | October 29, 2021 at 9:25 am | Reply

    The dark floor-to-ceiling glass, and stainless steel and aluminum facade. It looks on a supertall, and skinny on a supertower; beautiful progress that is not over: Thanks to Michael Young.

  4. I’m 73 y/o and a retired NY trial lawyer who no longer live in NY. The photos of the Dime’s interior show what large banks looked like when I was a kid – Monumental. Today, and for far too many years in my lifetime, the interior spaces for a bank’s customers are like fast food shops.
    MannyHanny (Manf Hanover) had a “monumental” branch on Montague one block from Court St. Beautiful interior.

  5. David in Bushwick | October 29, 2021 at 11:52 am | Reply

    Brooklyn Tower is a much more appropriate name for such an instantly iconic tower in the fastest growing borough.

  6. I’m homeless and have kids, We are all disabled. I need apartment for rent.
    its my birthday.

  7. Amazing. And the next wave of new DTB high-rises (on DeKalb, 80 Flatbush, Fulton/ Flatbush, Modell/PC Richards etc) is already rolling in. Can’t wait to see what happens after that! There’s still potential for a few more very tall buildings in the area and some real clunkers that should meet the wrecking ball.

  8. Brooklyn Tower is definitely what this building is–it’s the beacon and anchor of all of Brooklyn. It’s also very exciting to see that the building has topped out at its full and glorious 1066 feet. It is really so impressive. And those views are so cool too.

  9. I agree with most of the comments, but that bank interior is STUNNING! Amazing to think of that as the “local” bank branch years ago, compared to what we have today?! 🤔

    Will definitely make a trip to Brooklyn, on next visit to NY!
    Need a “Big Apple” fix in ’22! 🤗

  10. Its sleek in design but not productive.It has much less commercial space than what it replaced. Downtown Brooklyn went from busy civic and business center with lots of workers to luxury residential wasteland. Just because you put sleek tall buildings there doesn’t mean its progress. These are half empty luxury residential towers that displaced office and commercial space. Lots of businesses,offices and jobs left. Appearances are deceiving. It was promised these residential towers would bring down rent prices. The opposite has happened in the surrounding neighborhoods. The few “affordable” units are not affordable, plus they switch to market after the first tenant leaves. Nice play by the real estate industry. They got the rezoning in 2006 with the promise of jobs and affordable housing. All the massive infrastructure developed by our ancestors to create a center for civics and business for the borough was repurposed as an amenity for luxury residential real estate. Its becoming as sterile as Battery Park City.

  11. Clearly the best of the new giants. And that clock is really the center of the universe.

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