Tin Building


Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Renderings Revealed for South Street Seaport’s New Market Building, in Lower Manhattan

A complete set of renderings have been revealed for the 75,000-square-foot New Market building in Lower Manhattan’s South Street Seaport. The construction is part of a massive undertaking by the Howard Hughes Corporation and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in the South Street Seaport district. The community facility space will sit adjacent to the Pier 17 building and the Tin Building, which is currently being rebuilt and will reopen in early 2021.

Read More

Installation Begins on Tin Building’s Ornamental Fixtures in Seaport District

Work on the reconstruction of the historic Tin Building is making swift progress in the South Street Seaport District. Located on the rebuilt Pier 17 and next to the FDR Drive, the three-story steel-framed structure is being rebuilt 32 feet away from its original location and six feet higher above sea level. The 53,000-square-foot commercial project is designed by SHoP Architects and developed by the Howard Hughes Corporation, with Plaza Construction as the construction manager.

Read More

The Tin Building’s Relocation And Reconstruction Taking Shape In South Street Seaport

The reconstruction of the landmarked Tin Building is making steady progress in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport District. The original structure, made mostly of a wooden frame featuring an exterior of corrugated metal sheets, suffered a major fire in 1995 and later weathered extensive flood damage from Hurricane Sandy in 2012. After approvals from the city’s Landmark Preservation Commission in 2016, the structure was carefully dismantled and is now being rebuilt 33 feet away from its original location, directly to the west of Pier 17. SHoP Architects is in charge of the design and renovations, while the Howard Hughes Corporation is the developer of the project. Plaza Construction is the construction manager for the property.

Read More

Fetching more...