Renderings Revealed for South Street Seaport’s New Market Building, in Lower Manhattan

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & MerrillRendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

A complete set of renderings have been revealed for the 75,000-square-foot New Market building in Lower Manhattan’s South Street Seaport. The construction is part of a massive undertaking by the Howard Hughes Corporation and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in the South Street Seaport district. The community facility space will sit adjacent to the Pier 17 building and the Tin Building, which is currently being rebuilt and will reopen in early 2021.

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Rendering of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Renderings depict a light-colored facade with floor-to-ceiling windows and diagonal beams intersecting the views along the top cantilever portion of the building, providing vistas of the East River and Brooklyn waterfront. The rooftop features lush greenery with mechanicals set back toward FDR Drive. The ground floor will consist of commercial space with 17-foot-tall ceilings. Above that is the community facility space, wrapped in wide vertical beams across three of the sides, each spaced apart to provide a play of light and shadows. The event space, located on levels three and four, hangs over on the waterfront-facing elevation.

Blueprint of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Blueprint of South Street Seaport Market by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

There are approximately 212,000 square feet of unused air rights owned by the city at the New Market site. It remains to be seen if these will be transferred to 250 Water Street for the development of a supertall with the approval of the city and the New York City Economic Development Corporation.

A timeline of construction and completion for the New Market have yet to be announced.

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11 Comments on "Renderings Revealed for South Street Seaport’s New Market Building, in Lower Manhattan"

  1. Looks like a wooden structure… interesting

    • G. MacKenzie | May 3, 2020 at 11:39 am | Reply

      Where are the real authentic historic ships — ship Wavertree and schooner Pioneer?
      Make no mistake, Hughes has made a commercial, not an historic, district.

  2. Are you kidding? This is the oldest part of NYC…this is a slap in the face of history.

    • More like shot in the face, but that began with the construction of the FDR expressway, didn’t it?

      • It’s low rise, made of timber, on the other side of the FDR…how is this a slap in the face of history…are you aware of what it is replacing?

        • Honestly speaking, Ray, I don’t. I suppose I was pointing out that this part of old New York began disappearing long, long ago.

  3. Looks like Port Authority bus terminal

  4. WOW – More large event spaces (community/commercial, event and roof) with retail in an area that cannot sustain the retail it already has! Nothing about this has any historical context. HHC is mirroring the most successful part of Pier 17 – the concert venue on top by adding 3 more spaces turning it into a convention center. Initial renderings for pier 17 showed a lush green active public space roof – not a private concert venue. This is the same carrot showing active space on the roof and the possibility of a community area on the floor with no windows (it says commercial/community)…lets just drop the pretense and rename it for the intent – the Seaport Event Center – state of the art events on the waterfront in NYC.

  5. Nice use of wood and glass in combination, and the garden roof should be pleasant, BUT does any party of this project make sense in an era of rising sea levels?

  6. Does anyone fault a rich corporation that bought useless warf space at an agreeable rate.
    The exact year i dont know.

    But servicable space fpr high end retailers and glitzy holdiay parties and pony rides.

  7. Joseph Surenko | May 9, 2020 at 5:21 pm | Reply

    Should be period. So sad

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