City Council

Highest Residential Infinity Pool in Western Hemisphere Installed Atop Brooklyn Point, in Downtown Brooklyn

New York-based developer Extell has surpassed another milestone for 138 Willoughby Street, aka Brooklyn Point, in Downtown Brooklyn. Construction workers have now lifted and assembled the steel frame for the highest residential infinity-edge pool in the western hemisphere. The 27-foot-long pool is now in place on the roof deck of the 68-story, 720-foot-tall skyscraper, part of the third and final phase of the City Point complex.

Read More

Water Street Rezoning

City Council Approves Rezoning Proposal Allowing Pedestrian Arcade-to-Retail Conversions Along Water Street, Financial District

Earlier this week, the City Council voted to approve a rezoning proposal that would allow landlords of the commercial properties with public pedestrian arcades along Water Street, between Fulton and Whitehall streets in the Financial District, to convert the arcades into retail space in exchange for renovating adjacent public plazas. The total amount of space that could be converted spans 110,000 square feet across 20 buildings, DNAinfo reported. The rezoning requires retail conversions of greater than 7,500 square feet to be approved through the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP). It also limits the amount of street frontage chain banks and drugstores can take up, and requires the entire height of the arcade to be built out. Future renovations to the existing public plazas in the area could include new seating and planters, among other upgrades.


Council members David Greenfield and Peter Koo lead a public hearing on Intro 775 last September.

City Council Land Use Committee Approves Deadlines for Landmarking

Yesterday, the City Council’s Land Use committee voted through a contentious bill that would impose deadlines on the Landmarks Preservation Commission and its process of designating historic properties. Preservationists and their allies on the City Council overwhelmingly oppose the bill, Intro 775-A, because it would force the LPC to consider buildings and historic districts within two years of being calendared.

Read More

Fetching more...