100 Vandam Street’s Exterior Approaches Completion in Hudson Square

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

Almost all of the fenestration for the multi-story addition atop 100 Vandam Street is now complete and revealed from behind scaffolding in Hudson Square. Designed by COOKFOX and developed by Jeff Greene, the residential project involves the construction of 20 floors above a 132-year-old building that once operated as a coal power plant. The 300-foot-tall structure is located at the corner of Greenwich Street and Vandam Street.

Recent photos reveal the finished appearance of the upper floors, which were still mostly covered in scaffolding and black netting at the time of YIMBY’s last visit in May. A small section of the construction barrier still remains standing at the northwestern corner of the structure. Besides this, the rest of the exterior appears complete.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

A few more finishing touches remain to be completed at the very top of the structure, where a series of rectangular metal screens of varying dimensions are placed between horizontal concrete beams and obscure the rooftop mechanicals. A scaffolding rig can be seen hanging off the southern elevation near the flat parapet.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

Among the most appealing details of 100 Vandam Street’s design is the decorative metal railings with their etched patterns across every level. Landscaping and shrubbery will eventually be planted along the edges.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

Meanwhile, many of the arched windows on the lower part of the structure are temporarily covered with protective blue film and plastic. One set of windows on the narrow western profile shows the finished outcome of the restoration. Ground-floor work is progressing with the canopies made of concrete waiting to be enclosed. Sidewalk scaffolding and metal fencing still surround the perimeter.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street will yield around 177,000 square feet with 70 units, each averaging more than 2,500 square feet. The property will also contain 2,500 square feet of ground-floor commercial space. Renderings show a large private rooftop terrace on the western elevation and a smaller one near the top of the structure.

YIMBY estimates 100 Vandam Street to be finished sometime in the first half of 2021.

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14 Comments on "100 Vandam Street’s Exterior Approaches Completion in Hudson Square"

  1. I support reusing existing buildings for podiums of larger towers but this one doesn’t work. This is not very appealing to me.

  2. Looks like a cancerous growth sitting on top of a classic building. I agree with the previous comment.

  3. Looks really unfinished, surprisingly bad coming from COOKFOX

  4. Oof, that’s not a very attractive combo. Love the original brick base, but the addition – when I first looked at these photos I thought they were tearing that part down. I also agree with Thomas.

  5. Edward Cunningham | October 28, 2020 at 9:40 am | Reply

    One-word questIon: WHY?

  6. A missed opportunity to better integrate a tower with the podium. Neither work with the other. This project could have been much better.

  7. This looks great! I love the intentional contrast between new and old, and the balconies are so well done and nicely detailed.

  8. Agree with the commenters above. Love adaptive reuse and expansion, but this is really horrible!

  9. At least the old bldg. was not demolished for another glass box

  10. This is good. Don’t need to choose between preservation and growth.

  11. I trust efforts will be made to satisfactorily clean the exterior brickwork and stone embellishments of the historic building component of the development.

  12. Reminds me of the cheap crap that gets built in Italy. Right across the street is a new limestone building.

    No excuse.

  13. it just doesn’t work bed renovation it just doesn’t work

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