Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center’s Marble Façade Nears Completion in Financial District, Manhattan

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center. Rendering by LUXIGON

Façade installation is nearing completion on the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center, 138-foot-tall performance venue in the World Trade Center complex in the Financial District. Designed by REX with Davis Brody Bond Architects as the executive architect and developed by non-profit company The Perelman, the steel-framed edifice is located between Skidmore Owings & Merrill‘s One World Trade Center to the west, Vesey Street to the north, Fulton Street to the south, and Greenwich Street to the east. Sciame Construction, LLC is in charge of construction for the project.

Since our last update in late November, the marble exterior panels have enclosed the steel-framed volume with impressive speed, and now cover the entire cube with the exception of the strip where the construction elevator remains attached.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

One of the best vantage points to see the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center is from the adjacent 9/11 Memorial. The lack of foliage on the Swamp White Oak trees has made more of the building visible through the branches.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

Close-up shots show the symmetrical book-matched layout of the marble veins with the northern, western, and southern sides of the superstructure fully covered.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

Work is now focused on the main entrance, which feature a grand staircase tucked underneath the southwestern corner, and a ground-floor tubular cutout that should likely lead visitors to an ADA-compliant elevator. Fencing with renderings line the perimeter of the property, while a set of metal gates occasionally opens up for daily deliveries and machinery.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center is scheduled to open sometime in 2023, as stated on large sheets of printed renderings and photographs surrounding the premises.

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10 Comments on "Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center’s Marble Façade Nears Completion in Financial District, Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | January 1, 2022 at 9:15 am | Reply

    In the fourth image down, what is that high-rise under construction that seems to be stalled?

  2. That marble is beautiful. I thought that this would be very vanilla and forgettable. I was wrong.

  3. The marble is just stunning. This is probably the most beautiful building at the New World Trade Center. What a great way to kick off the New Year. 😊

  4. Looks good. Now can WTC2 now be constructed?

  5. My thoughts as well. Enough @ Hudson Yards.

  6. David : Sent From Heaven. | January 1, 2022 at 10:26 pm | Reply

    Work is now fucused on the main entrance, this is progressing. I trust large sheets of printed renderings, and photographs surrounding the premises: Thanks to Michael Young.

  7. David of Flushing | January 2, 2022 at 5:59 am | Reply

    The marble is very beautiful and recalls its uses in the Byzantine era with book-matched panels. While NYC is no longer a coal-burning city, acid rain is still a problem for marble and I hope it survives a long time. It recalls a bit the rare book library at Yale.

  8. Dynamic design, in the most simplistic of ways. Love the cantilevered-stairway grand entrance, too.

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