100 Vandam Street’s Addition and Conversion Nears Completion in Hudson Square, Manhattan

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

Construction is getting close to completion on 100 Vandam Street, a 20-story addition atop a ten-story, 133-year-old former power plant in Hudson Square. Designed by COOKFOX and developed by Jeff Greene, the 300-foot-tall project will yield 70 residential units and ground-floor retail space. The site is located at the intersection of Greenwich and Vandam Streets.

Since our last update back in late October, all of the black netting and scaffolding has been removed, and only minor touches remain to be completed on the brick masonry walls of the podium.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street (right). Photo by Michael Young

Sidewalk scaffolding and fencing still surround the corner property, but should be dismantled in the coming months as work on the sidewalks and brick fenestration above conclude. Further contributing to the building’s modern design will be the addition of shrubs and landscaping for loggia gardens, designed by Terrain-NYC, around the edges of each floor behind the railings. These are depicted in previous renderings.

100 Vandam Street, rendering by COOKFOX

100 Vandam Street, rendering by COOKFOX

The pinnacle culminates in a flat top and hides mechanical floor and units behind a dark translucent metal screen.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

The new addition is enclosed in floor-to-ceiling glass, decorative etched metal railings, and sloped overhanging panels, which double in function as both solar shades and as an extension of the reinforced concrete floor plates. The design of the ground-floor canopies also match the appearance of these architectural components.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

Work is also progressing on the setback on the western elevation that will serve as the larger of the building’s two outdoor terraces, where crews were spotted assembling the floor tiles. The other terrace is found on the last habitable floor on the western side of the tower facing the Hudson River.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

The following photos highlight the project’s contrasting architectural designs, as well as the detail in the ornate brickwork along the original roof parapet.

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street. Photo by Michael Young

100 Vandam Street is expected to yield around 177,000 square feet and will contain 70 units, each averaging more than 2,500 square feet apiece, along with 2,500 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor.

A final completion date has not been announced, though some time in the next several months is likely.

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9 Comments on "100 Vandam Street’s Addition and Conversion Nears Completion in Hudson Square, Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | March 12, 2021 at 8:13 am | Reply

    Now this is how you keep and build a city.

  2. As I’ve said before, I completely support reusing existing buildings for the podiums of larger towers, but this addition is just horrendous. The color pallet is very bland, and those terrace extension things are just so ugly. And adding plants to it is REALLY not going to help AT ALL. I really don’t think this is going to age very well, which is a shame because the old power plant building was very nice looking, yet now it has been ruined. What a missed opportunity here…

    • Not sure everyone is going to agree with your assessment. The only problem I see is that teh party wall with the fugly hotel next door is not great. The rest is quite good.

      De gustibus non est diputandum.

    • Totally agree!

  3. One guy who bought Bitcoin at $10 is buying all the apartments
    Just to keep them empty . Talk about a structure that shouldn’t have been built

  4. I’m always a supporter of new housing in NYC, and this addition is better than not doing one at all. However, the design for this building is atrocious and very clearly spearheaded by someone who’s spent too much time in Florida.

  5. Wow… I really love the base of this tower. Enough said?

  6. I agree with Thomas. Adaptive re-use is great. But this podium and base do not align aesthetically. Part of the problem is that the common architectural vernacular is that modern additions should be completely different architecturally from the re-use portion. This is actually an international standard. But set by whom? By architects. Supposedly this means we don’t affect the “purity” of the original structure. Fine, but keep philosophy where it belongs. As a zoning board commissioner, I hear this argument over and over. It ends up just being code for “this is what we are going to do to get our modern building built.”

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