Final Exterior Touches for 220 Central Park South Underway in Midtown

220 Central Park South,. Designed by Robert A. M. Stern.

Exterior work on Robert A. M. Stern Architects‘ limestone-clad 220 Central Park South is imminently close to completion. The 950-foot-tall residential skyscraper is located between Seventh Avenue and Columbus Circle and yields 593,000 square feet of some of the most expensive living space in New York. Vornado Realty Trust is the developer of the $1.4-billion, 67-story project and is expecting a $3.4 billion sellout. SLCE Architects is the executive architect, while Thierry W. Despont is the interior designer of the 118 condominiums.

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

Photographs taken from Central Park and from around the neighborhood show the finished look of the edifice and its slim eastern and western profiles. Only a few minor touches remain to be completed on the ground floor around the landscaped motor courtyard, porte-cochere, and breezeway. Meanwhile “The Villas,” an 18-story annex sits along Central Park South, featuring gentle setbacks and terraces that pay homage to the classic New York pre-war architecture of the early 20th century.

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

The limestone really absorbs the natural light and warmly glows during the golden hour.

220 Central Park South Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South from across the Hudson River. Photo by Michael Young

220 Central Park South has seen a number of units sold throughout 2020 and is still one of the best-selling properties in all of New York City. The most famous sale is the record-shattering $238 million 16-bedroom, 17-bathroom quadruplex penthouse bought by Ken Griffin, founder of Citadel, which made national headlines in January 2019. The exclusive one-of-a-kind unit is located between floors 50 through 53 and comes with high ceilings, massive windows, and a terrace that overlooks Central Park and upper Manhattan. The hedge fund billionaire made news again last October when he snapped up two abutting units on the 20th floor for just under $4 million, bringing his combined buying spree inside 220 Central Park South to around $244 million. Griffin’s worldwide real estate portfolio has now exceeded $1 billion.

Other residents who also call the skyscraper home include Sting, who purchased a $65.7 million penthouse, and heiress Renata de Camargo Nascimento. One unique amity is the residents-only Jean-Georges Vongerichten restaurant on the lower floors.

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TFC Horizon
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11 Comments on "Final Exterior Touches for 220 Central Park South Underway in Midtown"

  1. David in Bushwick | September 17, 2020 at 8:16 am | Reply

    The least vulgar new monument to Skyprick Row.

  2. the verde marble at street level on CPS is the best detail….why no photo?!

  3. What is the carbon footprint of all the buildings on “Billionaires Row? A very timely question to ask when the climate is out of control.

    • I’m no scientist but as far as I know, skyscraper living has a much lower carbon footprint than the Los Angeles equivalent of hundreds of single family mansions.

    • Yes a conventional single family mansion can be worse than some skyscrapers. However these buildings might be an exception due to there construction and use.

  4. 220 Central Park South is still technically under construction? Good greif. But I still love this building, don’t worry.

  5. On a very ( very ) basic level Robert Stern is as predictable as Gene Kaufman..I know, I know sacrilege. 🙂

  6. Monath: So were. Rosario Candella, James Carpenter, Emery Roth, et al. RAMS is in good company. His works will endure long after the glass boxes have faded into mediocrity.

  7. I still love how, in the rendering, the Nordstrom tower doesn’t exist.

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