JPMorgan Chase’s 270 Park Avenue Supertall Continues Climb Over Midtown East, Manhattan

270 Park Avenue. Rendering © DBOX for Foster + Partners

Construction continues to rise on 270 Park Avenue, JPMorgan Chase‘s 60-story supertall headquarters in Midtown East. Designed by Norman Foster of Foster + Partners and developed by Tishman Speyer, the 1,388-foot-tall skyscraper will yield 2.5 million square feet of office space and set the record for the tallest building in New York to be powered by hydroelectric energy. Banker Steel is in charge of steel fabrication and NYC Constructors is the general contractor for the property, which spans a full block bound by East 48th Street to the north, East 47th Street to the south, Park Avenue to the east, and Madison Avenue to the west.

The superstructure has continued to ascend steadily since our last update in mid-June, and has surpassed the roof level of the prewar building to the south. Patti & Sons has begun fireproofing the steel beams of the lower levels, as noted by the white finish on the first two office floors. This process will continue in step with the rising structure throughout the rest of the year and into 2023.

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

During our visit, we observed a constant parade of trucks delivering steel and rebar to the site, keeping the two construction cranes in constant motion hoisting the two-story columns and bundles of material up above East 47th Street.

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

Installation of the floor-to-ceiling glass and façade paneling has yet to commence, but could feasibly begin soon on the floors that have been fireproofed.

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

The following photo shows the diagonal steel columns two floors away from completing the first and largest diamond of the signature diagrid pattern. Above this peak, the massing will begin to set back from the street on the eastern and western elevations. Four more diamonds and three more setbacks will follow, each reducing in size up to the illuminated crown.

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

Meanwhile, work is ramping up on the multiple reinforced concrete cores within the base of 270 Park Avenue. The following photos show steel rebar protruding above formwork around the northwestern and southwestern corners behind the flared steel columns. Concrete pours should proceed imminently creating the walls that will surround the vertical trusses, and part of the assembly will be enclosed with large steel plates. The lobby floor will sit above street level, with staircases connecting the space to the sidewalk and ground-floor frontage.

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

270 Park Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

YIMBY last reported that 270 Park Avenue is anticipated to be completed by 2025.

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13 Comments on "JPMorgan Chase’s 270 Park Avenue Supertall Continues Climb Over Midtown East, Manhattan"

  1. The structure looks so engineered and sturdy. I find it really fascinating to see how the process of construction unfolds.

  2. I’ve never seen a concrete core go up after perimeter steel.

  3. David : Sent From Heaven. | August 8, 2022 at 10:01 am | Reply

    The tallest building in New York to be powered by hydroelectric energy, massive structure and beautiful with its different. Steel and the superstructure have continued, but design can blend to next door on illuminated: Thanks to Michael Young.

  4. Michael Young has again captured the sheer energy and excitement of this brilliant structure! Thank you!

  5. Michael Young, your construction photos continue to fascinate and instruct. You make the unlovely aspect of construction look stunningly beautiful. Keep up the great work, and thanks for treating us to these otherwise unobtainable views!

  6. It already looks better than the rendering.

  7. bob the builder | August 8, 2022 at 12:40 pm | Reply

    Excellent building, yes, but it will forever be marred by the wasteful destruction of the previous 270 Park Avenue. The new building should never be awarded LEED anything.

    • It will in all likelihood deserve higher LEED ratings than the previous building,and should not be cheated for being a more efficient use of the real estate than the old building could ever be.

  8. Now JP Morgan just needs to call their employees back to work.

  9. The rise of this Frankenstein looking building is most appauling and unfortunate. Without question the building represents Chase Manhattan Bank (JP Morgan) and Jamie Diamond’s out of control super egos. The design has absolutely nothing to do with either mid-town streetscape or sensible urban planning. So what’s actually going on here? Simple – it’s about providing construction jobs and more construction jobs in the City! I predict this building will have little or no benefit to the citizens of NYC. And I’m really getting tired of seeing Michael Young’s building construction photographs! What a bore……..

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