Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center’s Marble Façade Completes Installation in Financial District, Manhattan

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center. Rendering by LUXIGON

Façade installation is wrapping up on the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center, a 138-foot-tall performance venue in the World Trade Center complex in the Financial District. Designed by REX with Davis Brody Bond Architects as the executive architect and developed by The Perelman, the cubic steel-framed structure stands between Skidmore Owings & Merrill‘s One World Trade Center to the west, Vesey Street to the north, Fulton Street to the south, and Greenwich Street to the east.

The marble was first quarried and processed by Portuguese stone fabricator LSI; then delivered to France by ACG to be triple-laminated and treated with a low-e coating; shipped to Germany to be layered with insulated glazed units done by Interplane; then finally brought to Germany to Permasteelisa’s Gartner manufacturing plant to be conjoined into five-by 12-foot panels before being sent off to New York City.

At the time of our last update in January, the majority of the marble paneling had been installed with the exception of the gap on the western elevation where the construction elevator was attached. Since then, the hoist has been dismantled and the void has been filled in.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

Only the base and main staircase along the southern side of the performing arts center facing Fulton Street and the 9/11 Memorial & Museum are awaiting completion. Work should progress on these elements over the next several months as interior construction continues.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The main rendering shows the bottom portion of the Ronald O. Performing Arts Center with a black enclosure, as opposed to previous iterations that had the same marble slabs covering the entire building from the sidewalk to the flat roof parapet. This new design will make the cubic portion appear to float above the street, an illusion that will be more prominent at night when the marble is illuminated.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center. Rendering by LUXIGON

It won’t be too long before the view below completely matches the depiction.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center Photo by Michael Young.

The Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center is scheduled to open sometime in 2023, as stated on site, though an exact date has yet to be announced.

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20 Comments on "Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center’s Marble Façade Completes Installation in Financial District, Manhattan"

  1. David : Sent From Heaven. | May 9, 2022 at 9:20 am | Reply

    Created directly and personally by a particular artist, original design on real. New native materials are beautiful, and peaceful colors in the day: Thanks to Michael Young.

  2. The marble facade color and texture are an eyesore…

  3. Considering that marble is stone which is something literally dug out of the ground (in Vermont in this case) as opposed to being factory manufactured, what the contractor has managed to achieve here is well beyond excellent. Without any doubt, a first-class job.

    • The marble used on the Perelman was quarried in Portugal, the marble used at the Beinecke Library is the one that came from Vermont. I do wish the tone of the marble had been slightly cooler though.

      • Yeah. Wish the yellow tone was completely white but that really only because it seems to clash with 1WTC base.

  4. Mayor Kenny | May 9, 2022 at 1:41 pm | Reply

    Perfectly sterile and boring for the New New Yorker. A stripped down version of a Borg Cube

  5. David of Flushing | May 9, 2022 at 1:42 pm | Reply

    This makes the neighboring glass buildings seem boring by comparison.

  6. Gorgeous.

  7. Minimalism has the potential of being the richest in detailing- all done with professional ease (albeit very complicated and rich in its complexity).
    God is in the details.
    This is …. ummm? up to debate. It is a stimulating location for tourists- very nice location for cultural interaction.

  8. Maybe, maybe not.

  9. Absolutely gorgeous, I’m very surprised to see anyone criticizing this tbh. I guess people can’t appreciate subtlety?

  10. Full marks to Michael Young for the last pic, aligned perfectly with the rendering! So many complaints on YIMBY about poor renderings—this one was spot on! If you think this is an eyesore, I don’t know what to say…. A beautiful building! Michael Young—please go shoot interior next!

  11. The Cube.

  12. ahhhhhhh boring

  13. i pity the fool who has so seal this thing

  14. Magnificent!

  15. Are they still going to cover the roof in marble and greenery, like in the renders posted on the REX website?

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