The Spiral’s Steel Superstructure Continues to Rise at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards

Rendering of 66 Hudson Boulevard. Credit: BIG/Tishman Speyer.

Bjarke Ingels Group‘s 66 Hudson Boulevard, aka The Spiral, is rapidly climbing above Hudson Yards. Like its next-door neighbor 50 Hudson Yards, the 66-story supertall has nearly doubled in height since YIMBY’s last update in December. Tishman Speyer is the developer, Turner Construction Company is the construction manager, and Banker Steel is in charge of fabricating the steel for the 1,031-foot-tall commercial office skyscraper, which is expected to cost $3.7 billion.

The Spiral (left) next to 50 Hudson Yards, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral behind 50 Hudson Yards, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral (left) next to 50 Hudson Yards, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral (left) next to 50 Hudson Yards, photo by Michael Young

Construction had reached 23 floors above the podium level last Thursday at the time the photographs were taken. Several steel core columns being assembled around the eastern construction crane can be spotted from above. The dark safety cocoon is steadily rising with the quick pace of work, while black netting covers the perimeters of the completed floors. Fireproofing is also progressing at an even pace.

The Spiral currently surpassing construction of 50 Hudson Yards, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

Photo by Michael Young

A secondary elevator hoist is climbing up the north side along West 35th Street.

Photo by Michael Young

More of the reflective glass is continuing to be installed around the lower stories.

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

One interesting aspect of the structural engineering is the diagonal steel columns underneath each stepped section that help transfer the loads from the inside to the edge of each floor plate. This condition will continue to follow around the setbacks up to the top of the edifice. Eventually the glass envelope will further distinguish the spiraling effect of the façade, with setbacks topped by a cascade of landscaping and shrubbery.

A close-up of one of the corners that have the stepped spiraling setback. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral, photo by Michael Young

The superstructure should continue its swift ascent, especially as the weather begins to warm up. The best views of The Spiral are from across the Hudson River in New Jersey or looking south down Tenth Avenue from around the Jacob K. Javits Center. The wide northern profile shows how big of a presence the skyscraper already has on the evolving and vertically growing neighborhood.

The Spiral is expected to be finished around 2022.

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8 Comments on "The Spiral’s Steel Superstructure Continues to Rise at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards"

  1. It’s like a ‘race’ between these two buildings. Fun to watch.

  2. Scandinavian architects make the most bland, tasteless designs anywhere. Is a cultural thing and no way around it. Their buildings are sturdy, very comfortable inside and FUNCTIONAL–as are normal Scandinavian houses and offices. BUT, they look totally bland, and when very large, they blight the neighborhood with their non-descript mass. Just look at this pedigocial copy of the grand and beautiful Tower of Samarra (in Iraq). The original is a pleasure to the eyes (in fact, that is what “Samarra” means in Arabic–pleasure to the eyes!). Not this thing though.

    • Hmm..let’s give this a chance..But l have to admit that at least in the rendering here, the very top of the SPIRAL seems quite uninspiring to me. l would have expected something a bit more interesting.

  3. I think I saw Michael Young taking these photos. Cool

  4. Nice seems fast, such a awesome project love the concept.

  5. Again, I hope I live long enough to see the spectacular coffee-table book of Michael Young’s photos, should he make one.

  6. David R Wilson | March 15, 2020 at 4:55 pm | Reply

    Can anyone tell me why construction on many of the supertall buildings slows to a snails pace when the building tops out? I have noticed that Central Park ( Nordstrom ) Tower,111 west 57th,and One Vanderbilt have been sitting for months with the top,maybe 5-7 floors unfinished.Why is it that the building will be progressing so fast,then at the top progress takes months?

  7. Michael D. Skelly | June 28, 2020 at 2:47 pm | Reply

    Wait till there finished, you will get apts. for 30 per cent less then present price…….

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