Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel Debuts at 112 West 25th Street

Rendering of the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel's ground floor entrywayRendering of the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel's ground floor entryway

Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel is now officially open and arrives as the brand’s premiere hotel in the neighborhood. At 430 feet tall, it is also one of the tallest structures ever constructed in Chelsea. The property is located at 112 West 25th Street and replaced the long-running Antiques Garage indoor flea market, considered one of the go-to destinations for antique shoppers. The hotel’s interiors, courtesy of architects Stonehill Taylor, pay homage to the iconic market and Chelsea’s eclectic history.

The design team was specifically inspired by the neighborhood’s diverse mix of industrial architecture, floral markets, and buzzing art scene. Within, each of the hotel’s 341 guest rooms features earth tones, brass-colored finishes, and specially curated artwork by Indiewalls. The most noteworthy component of the hotel are its amenity spaces, which include one of the highest outdoor pools in Manhattan and a two-floor rooftop lounge spanning the 38th and 39th floors.

The Presidential Suite at the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

The Presidential Suite at the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

The Presidential Suite at the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

The Presidential Suite at the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

The hotel also contains 7,326 square feet of flexible event space with a large ballroom designed to accommodate up to 200 guests.

“Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel encourages guests to discover this iconic location with a sense of reimagined curiosity,” said George Fleck, vice president of global brand marketing and management, Renaissance Hotels. “This new hotel, coupled with our significant growth and renovation strategy in North America, further reinforces our brand’s global commitment to ensuring that guests experience the DNA of the neighborhood through our dramatic design and engaging guest experiences—ultimately leaving with a new appreciation of the destination.”

View of Cotto at Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

View of Cotto at Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

Award-winning Italian chef Fabrizio Facchini will serve as executive chef for Cotto, the hotel’s signature restaurant. The dining room is flanked by ten-foot-tall floor-to-ceiling windows with exposed wood beams, and decorated with sourced antiques from around the world.

Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel is owned by Lam Generation, which is also the developer for Renaissance New York Harlem, and managed by Real Hospitality Group. Bookings for the Chelsea location are now available beginning around $160 per night.

Rooftop view from the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

Rooftop view from the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel

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8 Comments on "Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel Debuts at 112 West 25th Street"

  1. This sounds very nice, and how to build a hotel the right way…
    acknowledge the neighborhood, incorporate elements that reflect the history, and use quality materials.

    It’s the “anti-Chang”!

  2. David in Bushwick | March 5, 2020 at 10:40 am | Reply

    Wow, that’s a new historical exterior base. Too bad it’s set back from the street wall, but…
    And for the interiors, so glad to see color has come back.

  3. Another absurd setback hotel tower with a bizarre lowrise base. What are others seeing different here than I am???

  4. If the task is to design a classical base, why not design one that is not only proportionately correct, but mannered and interesting……and, would anyone really want to stay in rooms that look as shown in the photo? (I need a bath after looking at the photos)

  5. My comment was censored by YIMBY

  6. Thank you Nikolai. I did not know that, as it appeared after I posted it, then disappeared.
    One suggestion: Just like the rules of proportion, sentences have structure, and punctuation.
    It helps us keep communications architecturally and humanly on a playing field of higher quality. (An email address to reach you without going public would also be professional for a business like YIMBY. Cheers).

  7. This piece doesn’t say who designed the building, only the interiors. It sure as hell looks like a Gene Kaufman special, with that horrendous fake facade that looks to be hiding mechanicals behind the “windows”. Kaufman specializes in fake streetwalls that skirt zoning regulations. Total garbage design.

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