Permits Filed for 3254, 3258 Parkside Place, Norwood, The Bronx

3254, 3258 Parkside Place, via Google Maps3254, 3258 Parkside Place, via Google Maps

Permits have been filed for two six-story buildings at 3254 and 3258 Parkside Place, in the Norwood neighborhood of The Bronx. The site is four blocks away from the Williams Bridge train station, serviced by Metro North. Six blocks away is the 205th Street subway station, serviced by the D trains. The project will also be nearby the notable Woodlawn Cemetery, an expansive collection of some of the most ornate mausoleums and tombstones in the city. UA Builders Group will be responsible for the development.

The two structures will reach a peak height of 71 feet, yielding 77,640 square feet within, with 65,530 square feet dedicated to residential use. 98 apartments will be created, averaging 670 square feet apiece, indicating rentals. F.A.R. for 3254 and 3258 will be 1.35 and 1.57 respectively. Storage for forty-four bicycles will be included in the cellar. The buildings will be crowned by rooftop recreational spaces.

3254, 3258 Parkside Place Lot shape, image from NYC Planning Zoning and Land Use Map

3254, 3258 Parkside Place Lot shape, image from NYC Planning Zoning and Land Use Map

The development comes in a long, narrow lot with a length of 946 feet to go with its width of 37 feet. The 17,500 square foot space is zoned for R7-B development, dedicated to medium-density apartment buildings, a common zoning for the Bronx, Upper West Side, and Brighton Beach.

Marin Architects will be responsible for the design.

Demolition permits have not yet been filed, and the estimated completion date has not been announced.

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Dahlia Horizon
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2 Comments on "Permits Filed for 3254, 3258 Parkside Place, Norwood, The Bronx"

  1. Woodlawn Cemetery is a 400-acre cemetery (FYI – that’s half the size of Central Park) and a designated National Historic Landmark – not “an expansive collection of some of the most ornate mausoleums and tombstones.” We’re talking real people here, some of them quite notable as well.

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