Extell’s Central Park Tower Gets Fresh Renderings, Nears Halfway Point at 217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell

The last time YIMBY checked on progress at Extell’s Central Park Tower, rising at 217 West 57th Street, glass installation had just begun, and the building was several floors above its cantilever. Three months later, the supertall’s superstructure is pushing towards its halfway point, and stands over 700 feet above the streets below. New renderings for the project have also appeared alongside its partially-launched website, giving a better idea of interiors, as well as the nighttime lighting scheme.

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell, featuring what is likely the World’s Luckiest Dog

The skyline rendering depicts the tower from the south, and shows intricacies in the exterior that should give the supertall an attractive crown. The interior renderings also show the extruded metallic elements along the outside in a bit more detail.

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell

217 West 57th Street will eventually stand slightly over 1,550 feet to its rooftop, making it the tallest building in the Five Boroughs by roof height. The parapet will sit about 150 feet above 432 Park Avenue, and over 100 feet above 111 West 57th Street, which is omitted from the new renderings.

217 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

217 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill Architects are designing the building, which will include Nordstrom’s flagship New York City location in its lower levels. James Carpenter Design Associates is responsible for the design of that portion, which will stand 280 feet to its top floor. With the seven-story Nordstrom reaching heights that could suffice for a 30-story tower, the interiors are sure to impress.

217 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

217 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Above, there will be a mix of uses, until residential takes over from the cantilever on up. Current plans show 183 units, at an anticipated average size of over 5,000 square feet apiece, all of which will be condominiums. According to the EB-5 materials, the uppermost penthouse will be a 17,000 square foot triplex spanning marketing levels 129-131.

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell

217 West 57th Street, aka Central Park Tower, image via Extell, full-res at link

Completion is anticipated for 2019, and the current pace of construction seems on track to meet that deadline. While work took several months to pass the cantilever, progress has been fairly swift since then, and the regularities of the upper residential floors should ensure swift progress until the superstructure reaches the parapet.

217 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

217 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Given the massive scope of the tower, that is probably still about a year away. In the meantime, glass is rising across the exterior, and interior work is underway on the lower floors.

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3 Comments on "Extell’s Central Park Tower Gets Fresh Renderings, Nears Halfway Point at 217 West 57th Street"

  1. Yes indeed, there’s no doubt about it.
    Now, more than ever,
    the “fresh new renderings” of this pretentious building
    look like a rich old man’s haughty upraised middle finger,
    aimed at both the City and all the poor peons scurrying down below.
    (Hopefully rich old ladies would be a bit more genteel
    in their arrogance, but nowadays you never know.)
    And I do believe that the cantilevered base enhances the effect.
    Bravo! to the architect for his innate (if inadvertent) honesty.

  2. Personally, I think this is a very uninspiring building. One of those that people in the future will regard with distaste.

  3. It fulfills a variety of needs, which is probably a good thing, yet it is a master of none. The shop base facade and the cantilever are just odd and the unresolved crown is most disappointing.

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