Six Stories of Retail Come Together at 529 Broadway in SoHo

529 Broadway, photo by Tectonic529 Broadway, photo by Tectonic

A copper-colored, terra cotta and glass facade has emerged at 529 Broadway, on the corner of Spring Street in SoHo. Tectonic has the latest look at the construction.

529 Broadway, photo by Tectonic

529 Broadway, photo by Tectonic

The unique design had to win approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, because it sits inside the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. One commissioner called it “as exciting a building as I’ve seen [in my time] on the committee” and another deemed it “a brilliant piece of architecture.” BKSK Architects came up with the design, which they describe as a “terra cotta rain screen and glass curtain wall facade system.”

The building wasn’t inspiring last time YIMBY checked in on the construction, in March, but the newly installed, copper-y panels and detailing have improved the facade.

529 Broadway, photo by Tectonic

529 Broadway, photo by Tectonic

The finished, six-story project will have 44,243 square feet of retail, and Nike might fill all or part of the space, according to neighborhood blog Bowery Boogie.

Longtime owner Abe Goldstein, whose father purchased the prime corner property for $1 million back in 1980, unloaded it for $147.9 million in 2013. Aurora Capital Associates, Wharton Properties, Thor Equities and the Adjmi family were the buyers. Working with BKSK, they decided to demolish the old two-story commercial building on the property and develop a structure based on the Prescott House Hotel, which occupied the spot from 1853 until its demise during the Great Depression.

Work is scheduled to finish by the end of the year.

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4 Comments on "Six Stories of Retail Come Together at 529 Broadway in SoHo"

  1. f’in gorgeous!!!! I love it.

  2. Looking up, center and down controls me to see, because its luxury architecture on a unique building.

  3. Gregory Kennerly | September 3, 2016 at 8:54 am |

    Wow. Just wow.

  4. Beautiful! It balances contextual and modern perfectly. Big fan of the projected window framing. Top cornice feels dark, maybe the photography.

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