Slate Property Group



1 Flatbush Avenue

19-Story, 183-Unit Mixed-Use Building Rises to Ninth Floor at 1 Flatbush Avenue, Downtown Brooklyn

Construction is now nine floors above street level on the 19-story, 183-unit mixed-use building under development at 1 Flatbush Avenue, located on the corner of Fulton Street in Downtown Brooklyn. Progress can be seen thanks to photos posted to the YIMBY Forums by Tectonic. The latest building permits indicate the project will encompass 133,936 square feet and rise 206 feet to its main roof, not including bulkhead elements.


92-61 165th Street

14-Story, 89-Unit Mixed-Use Project Tops Out At 92-61 165th Street, Jamaica

Construction has quietly topped out on the 14-story, 89-unit mixed-use affordable housing building under development at 92-61 165th Street, located on the corner of Archer Avenue in downtown Jamaica. A rendering of the project has also been spotted on the construction fence. The latest building permits indicate the structure measures 93,041 square feet and rises 132 feet above street level to its roof.


Scaffolds Come Down at 83 Bushwick Place, Junction of East Williamsburg and Bushwick

What is Brooklyn? For many, the borough is associated with new buildings populated with young professionals fleeing Manhattan, where the cost of living rises as high as the skyscrapers. Some prefer to dismiss them as silver-spoon suburban transplants wishing to emulate some fantasy starving artist lifestyle, which they would assert is long-gone from the borough. Others would disagree, pointing at the “authentic Bohemians” living in rundown, graffiti-covered, and sometimes illegally-run lofts on the fringes of industrial districts, not yet touched by true gentrification. In contrast to another stereotype, which presumes that manufacturing has also left the borough, these pockets of industry still teem with activity, whether in dusty cement-mixing lots, in auto shops that clog the sidewalks in front of them with rides-in-progress, or in manufacturing plants where they are rightfully entitled to slap a “Made in Brooklyn” label onto their wares.

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