Landmarks

54 Canal Street

Landmarked 12-Story Jarmulowsky Bank Building Now Getting Office-Retail Conversion, 54 Canal Street, Chinatown

Back in December of 2012, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved alterations that would go into converting the 12-story, 60,000-square-foot Jarmulowsky Bank Building, an individual landmark at 54 Canal Street (a.k.a. 9 Orchard Street) in Chinatown, into a boutique hotel. Then in 2014, DLJ Real Estate Partners received approval from the LPC to reconstruct the building’s corner cupola, which was removed in 1990. Construction has since been underway on the existing building, as well as a six-story, 9,876-square-foot annex expansion at 60 Canal Street. Now, the owners are abandoning plans for a hotel and have decided to convert the interiors into office and retail space, Bowery Boogie reported. The first two floors will also host retail whiles the upper floors will be leased to office tenants. Lower East Side-based Studio Castellano Architects is the architect of record. It’s not known when the building is scheduled to open.



98 Montague Street

14-Story, 279-Key Esplendor Bossert Brooklyn Hotel Will Open in October at 98 Montague Street, Brooklyn Heights

Back in 2012, Clipper Equity and the Chetrit Group acquired, from the Jehovah’s Witnesses for $81 million, the 14-story Bossert Hotel building at 98 Montague Street, in Brooklyn Heights. It has since been undergoing a conversion back to the structure’s original use as a hotel, and now it has been revealed that the the building will open on October 1, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported. Re-dubbed Esplendor Bossert Brooklyn, it will be operated by Fën Hotels. The latest building permits indicate there will be 279 hotel rooms. It will feature a 1,997-square-foot restaurant on the first floor, a 2,995-square-foot lobby café, and a 2,300-square-foot restaurant on the 14th floor. The rooftop terrace will measure 1,922 square feet and will be utilized by the restaurant. New York-based Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman + Associates Architects (GSKA) is behind the design of the renovation. The building sits within the Brooklyn Heights Historic District.



Council members David Greenfield and Peter Koo lead a public hearing on Intro 775 last September.

City Council Land Use Committee Approves Deadlines for Landmarking

Yesterday, the City Council’s Land Use committee voted through a contentious bill that would impose deadlines on the Landmarks Preservation Commission and its process of designating historic properties. Preservationists and their allies on the City Council overwhelmingly oppose the bill, Intro 775-A, because it would force the LPC to consider buildings and historic districts within two years of being calendared.

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