Landmarks



4302 4th Avenue

City Now Planning Public School Redevelopment at Landmarked Police Station, 4302 Fourth Avenue, Sunset Park

In January, developer Yosef Streicher disclosed preliminary plans to redevelop the long-vacant, three-story 68th Police Precinct Station House and Stable, an individual landmark at 4302 Fourth Avenue, located on the corner of 43rd Street in Sunset Park. The plan was for some sort of community facility, a café, and roughly 10 residential units. The New York City School Construction Authority (SCA) has since struck a deal with the developer to transform the property into an over 300-student public school, the Brooklyn Paper reported, which means the original plans are out the window. The SCA also disclosed the possibility and likelihood that the buildings could be demolished. Since the structures are an individual landmarks, that means the Landmarks Preservation Commission would have to approve its demolition (a highly unlikely event). The city could automatically demolish the landmark if the structures are deemed hazardous.


Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava

City Orders Demolition of Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava’s Burnt Remains

As May came to an end, the New York City Fire Department was investigating the fire that gutted the Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava, an individual landmark at 15 West 25th Street in the Flatiron District. Authorities and engineers were studying the structural integrity of the remains, and have now declared the church “too unstable to be left standing,” the New York Post reported. That means the main house of worship will be demolished. The rectory portion of the cathedral, which was unscathed during the fire, currently also has Landmarks protection, which should mean it won’t be demolished with the main structure. The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has the option to de-designate the property, too, but we think, at the very least, the LPC will want to keep the rectory a landmark. The Executive Board of St. Sava will now decide if they will rebuild on the property or relocate. The site has 244,450 square feet of mixed-use development rights, minus the usable square-footage of the rectory.


54 Canal Street

Landmarked 12-Story Jarmulowsky Bank Building Now Getting Office-Retail Conversion, 54 Canal Street, Chinatown

Back in December of 2012, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved alterations that would go into converting the 12-story, 60,000-square-foot Jarmulowsky Bank Building, an individual landmark at 54 Canal Street (a.k.a. 9 Orchard Street) in Chinatown, into a boutique hotel. Then in 2014, DLJ Real Estate Partners received approval from the LPC to reconstruct the building’s corner cupola, which was removed in 1990. Construction has since been underway on the existing building, as well as a six-story, 9,876-square-foot annex expansion at 60 Canal Street. Now, the owners are abandoning plans for a hotel and have decided to convert the interiors into office and retail space, Bowery Boogie reported. The first two floors will also host retail whiles the upper floors will be leased to office tenants. Lower East Side-based Studio Castellano Architects is the architect of record. It’s not known when the building is scheduled to open.


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