Howard Hughes

The Tin Building’s Relocation And Reconstruction Taking Shape In South Street Seaport

The reconstruction of the landmarked Tin Building is making steady progress in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport District. The original structure, made mostly of a wooden frame featuring an exterior of corrugated metal sheets, suffered a major fire in 1995 and later weathered extensive flood damage from Hurricane Sandy in 2012. After approvals from the city’s Landmark Preservation Commission in 2016, the structure was carefully dismantled and is now being rebuilt 33 feet away from its original location, directly to the west of Pier 17. SHoP Architects is in charge of the design and renovations, while the Howard Hughes Corporation is the developer of the project. Plaza Construction is the construction manager for the property.

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1,436-Foot Tall 80 South Street Becomes Largest Likely Casualty Of Chinese-Owned Development Bust

Ever since the Beijing-based conglomerate China Oceanwide Holdings acquired two sites in New York’s South Street Seaport from Howard Hughes Corp. in the Financial District in 2016 for $390 million, the site’s future has remained as opaque as the company itself. Oceanwide apparently planned to build a mixed-use supertall as high as 1,436 feet at 80 South Street (which includes the second site it purchased from Howard Hughes at 163 Front Street).

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80 South Street

First Glimpse of SHoP’s 80 South Street, Set to Soar Over 1,400 Feet

Yesterday was ‘Archmodel Wednesday’ on Instagram, which meant that YIMBY Forumers were actively posting images of several new developments. And in the background of an image containing SHoP’s 111 West 57th Street, our team of cyber-sleuths spotted another project that has not yet been revealed. 80 South Street’s massing diagram had alluded to the tower’s supertall potential, but now we have a look at an actual model of the building, though the fine-grained details remain fuzzy, which confirms that the tower will rise over 1,400 feet tall. That would make it the tallest building by roof height in Lower Manhattan, standing approximately 50 feet above the rooftop of One World Trade Center.

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